Trevor Talks Trash

Recycling has become one of those “too much of a good thing” things, particularly recycling plastics.

What happened in the 1960s and ’70s wasn’t that recycling was invented, but that the reasons for it changed. Rather than recycle in order to get the most out of the materials, Americans began to recycle in order to deal with the massive amounts of waste produced during the second half of the 20th century.

Olivia B. Waxman, The History of Recycling in America Is More Complicated Than You May Think, Time magazine, November 15, 2016

With this shift, recycling programs & propaganda skyrocketed in the U.S. Now, however, countries that previously took our recyclable trash are sending it back. Here is The Daily Show’s Trevor Noah with a humorous and informative take on the problem:

And remember, it’s “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” – in that order

World Environment Day 2019

Today, China hosts the global World Environment Day celebrations with the theme: #BeatAirPollution.

Approximately 7 million people worldwide die prematurely each year from air pollution, with about 4 million of these deaths occurring in Asia-Pacific. World Environment Day 2019 will urge governments, industry, communities, and individuals to come together to explore renewable energy and green technologies, and improve air quality in cities and regions across the world.


The Government of China has committed to organizing World Environment Day celebrations across multiple cities, with Hangzhou, in the province of Zhejiang, to host the main event…


China with its growing green energy sector, has emerged as a climate leader. The country owns half the world’s electric vehicles and 99 percent of the world’s electric buses.

UNenvironment.org

An Inconvenient Truth for Miami

“Miami, in terms of assets at risk, is the number one city at risk in the entire world for sea level rise. This is a major crisis.” ~~ Vice President Al Gore in “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power”

Celebrate ‘World Oceans Day’ 2019 Miami-Style

Next Saturday, June 8th, is World Oceans Day.

On World Oceans Day, people around our blue planet celebrate and honor the ocean, which connects us all. Get together with your family, friends, community, and the planet to start creating a better future. Working together, we can and will protect our shared ocean.

WorldOceansDay.org

A collective of experiences honoring World Oceans Day hosted by the 1 Hotel South Beach

This event is powered by Anatomy. Each session is held within the picturesque property of the 1 Hotel South Beach in Beautiful Miami!

All ticket donations go to The Surfrider Foundation – Miami, a non-profit grassroots organization dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of our world’s oceans, waves and beaches.

Green Jobs

We need to recognize the opportunity that green jobs present to Florida and to the economy.

Congressman Ted Deutch

Eco-architecture

We have to change from ‘ego-architecture’ to ‘eco-architecture’.

Jaime Lerner

Make the Future Cooler, Safer, and Healthier

It’s too late to avoid a 21st century that is completely transformed by the forces of climate change, but we have to do everything possible to make the future cooler, safer, and healthier.

David Wallace-Wells

Celebrate Earth Day 2019 by Supporting H.R. 763

Earth Day 2019 seems like an appropriate day to remind ourselves of the realities of climate change, and that there is no Planet B.

This blog started in April 2010 (goodness, has it been that long!) with a focus on green building in Miami. And it is still that. But much like I imagine journalist David Wallace-Wells felt collecting disparate articles with one terrifying, unifying thread – I’ve realized that if we, as a nation and as a planet, do not address climate change now, it won’t matter how great the sustainable buildings are in Miami. They will be underwater.

I’ve also realized that the Energy Innovation & Carbon Dividend Act (H.R. 763) is the best, quickest way for the United States to begin addressing our country’s carbon emissions.

What is the Energy Innovation & Carbon Dividend Act

According to energyinnovationact.org, there are two primary features – a “carbon fee” and a “carbon dividend” – and two protections for businesses.

Carbon Fee

This policy puts a fee on fossil fuels like coal, oil, and gas. It starts low, and grows over time. This will drive down carbon pollution because energy companies, leading industries, and American consumers will move toward cleaner, cheaper options.

Carbon Dividend

The money collected from the carbon fee is allocated in equal shares every month to the American people to spend as they see fit. Program administrative costs are paid from the fees collected. The government does not keep any of the money from the carbon fee.

Border Carbon Adjustment

To protect U.S. manufacturers and jobs, imported goods will pay a border carbon adjustment, and goods exported from the United States will receive a refund under this policy.

Regulatory Adjustment

This policy preserves effective current regulations, like auto mileage standards, but pauses the EPA authority to regulate the CO2 and equivalent emissions covered by the fee, for the first 10 years after the policy is enacted. If emission targets are not being met after 10 years, Congress gives clear direction to the EPA to regulate those emissions to meet those targets. The pause does not impact EPA regulations related to water quality, air quality, health or other issues. This policy’s price on pollution will lower carbon emissions far more than existing and pending EPA regulations.

For more information about the Energy Innovation & Carbon Dividend Act, please visit Energy Innovation Act org and Citizens Climate Lobby . And to read the full text of the bill, click here:

I can’t think of a better way to celebrate Earth Day 2019 than to voice my support for H.R. 763 – The Energy Innovation & Carbon Dividend Act. How about you?

Changing Seas: Toxic Waters

University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science, in partnership with WPBT2 South Florida PBS and CHANGING SEAS, is hosting the premiere screening of “Toxic Waters”, the newest episode in Season 10 from this public television series produced by WPBT2 South Florida PBS in Miami, Florida.

Harmful algal blooms come in many forms, from toxic outbreaks impacting the health of animals and humans, to non-toxic but expansive sargassum mats devastating local economies and tourism. Scientists are working to understand what causes these blooms, how they impact us, and how we can stop them.

The event is free, but an RSVP is required. Seating begins at 5:30; screening starts at 6:00 p.m. with a panel discussion after.

Location: Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, Miami, FL 33149

Date And Time: Monday, April 22, 2019 | 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm EDT